Using information found in Bedford County, Tennessee tax lists


Table of contents

1 Information found in tax lists 2 Using tax lists in research
1.1 Introduction 2.1 Introduction
1.2 Who is listed in a tax list 2.2 Ages and relationships
1.3 Polls, school land, and other concepts found in tax lists 2.3 Period of residence
1.4 1812 tax list 2.4 Ownership of taxable property
1.5 1814 tax list 2.5 Date of death
1.6 1836 tax list 2.6 Identification of land passed by probate
1.7 1837 tax list 2.7 Newly acquired property
1.8 1838 tax list 3 Partial transcription of the 1814 tax list
1.9 1839 tax list  

1 Information found in tax lists

1.1 Introduction

This document is a tutorial on the types of information found in tax lists and how that information can be used in historical and genealogical research. The emphasis is on the early tax lists of Bedford County, Tennessee but most of the information applies to the tax lists of other locations as well. The information contained in each tax list along with some general principles explaining the meaning of some of that information is described in the following sub-clauses.

1.2 Who is listed in a tax list?

Tax lists enumerate property under the name of the person responsible for paying the tax. This is most often the owner of the property, however a person who rented or leased the property may be listed instead of the owner in some cases. Also a person who actually resides in a different location will be listed in the tax list of a civil district if their property (usually land or slaves) is located in that district.

Free male persons of certain ages who owned no taxable property still had to pay a tax called a "poll tax". In the early tax lists of Bedford County, Tennessee all free males who resided in a given civil district and whose age was at least 21 but less than 50 had to pay a poll tax in that district. Females who were the heads of households are also listed.

1.3 Polls, school land, and other concepts found in tax lists

The property taxed in each year that tax was collected was determined by an act of the Legislature of Tennessee that established the collection of the tax in that year.  Not all types of property were taxed in each year, so the lists for each year may provide slightly different information.

Tax lists often contain counts of "white polls" and "black polls". The word "poll" used in this manner means "a counting of heads or people; a census" and does directly relate to any tax paid for the purposes of voting. In early Bedford County, Tennessee tax lists the abbreviation "WP" is used for "white poll" while slaves are listed as "slaves" and not "black polls".

When lands were given out by grant in early Tennessee and North Carolina, a portion of each section was set aside "for the use of schools". These large tracts of land were not needed immediately for school purposes so much of the land was leased for agriculture. Leased school land was taxed at a different rate from private land and is listed separately on tax lists.

Lots in an established town were listed separately and taxed at a different rate from land used for other purposes. Some early Bedford County, Tennessee tax lists include "town lots" as a taxable item.

1.4 1812 tax list

Example from the 1812 tax list

The 1812 tax list contains the following information for each entry:

  1. name
  2. Enumeration order

Example: James Patton, 1

1.5 1814 tax list

Example 1 (left half page) from the 1814 tax list
Example 2 (right half page) from the 1814 tax list

The prose at the front of the list says:

"General list of lands, lots of ground and their improvement dwelling houses and slaves within the 5th assessment district composed of Bedford County within the State of Tennessee owned or possessed or under the care and management of persons on the 1st day of February 1814 residing within the same."
The 1814 tax list contains the following information for each entry:

  1. names of owners or possessors
  2. Land and Lots of ground, Valuation
  3. Dwelling houses [number and size]
  4. Out buildings [number]
  5. Valuation of lands, lots and dwelling houses as determined by the appointed appraisers
  6. Male Slaves under 12 years
  7. Male Slaves between 12 and 51 years
  8. Male Slaves over 51 years
  9. Female Slaves under 12 years
  10. Female Slaves between 12 and 51 years
  11. Female Slaves over 51 years
  12. Valuation [of slaves] as determined by the appointed appraisers
  13. Total valuation of taxable property of each individual as determined by the appointed appraisers
  14. Total valuation of taxable property of each individual as reexamined and equalized by the Principal Appraiser [this column is blank]

Example: Christopher Shaw, 450 acres in Garrison Fork, Puncheon Camp Creek, no dwelling houses, 4 out buildings, valuation $3030.50, 1 Male Slave under 12 years, 6 Male Slaves between 12 and 51 years, 0 Male Slaves over 51 years, 2 Female Slaves under 12 years, 3 Female Slaves between 12 and 51 years, 1 Female Slave over 51 years, valuation of slaves $4,150

1.6 1836 tax list

Example from the 1836 tax list

The 1836 tax list contains the following information for each entry:

  1. Person's names
  2. Acres of land
  3. Value (of land)
  4. Tax (on land)
  5. Acres of School Land
  6. Value (of School Land)
  7. Tax (on School Land)
  8. Lots
  9. Value (of lots)
  10. Tax (on lots)
  11. Slaves 12-50
  12. Value (of Slaves)
  13. Tax (on Slaves)
  14. Carriages
  15. Value (of Carriages)
  16. Tax (on Carriages)
  17. White polls
  18. Tax (on White Polls)
  19. Amount of State Tax
  20. Total State and County Tax

Example: Nobel J. Majors, 62 acres, $320 value, $0.32 tax, 86 acres of school land, $4.30 value, $0.43 tax, no carriages, no slaves, 1 white poll, $0.25 tax, $.50 State tax, $1.00 total tax

1.7 1837 tax list

Example from the 1837 tax list

The 1837 tax list contains the following information for each entry:

  1. Person's names
  2. Acres of land
  3. Value (of land)
  4. Tax (on land)
  5. Acres of School Land
  6. Value (of School Land)
  7. Tax (on School Land)
  8. Number of Town lots
  9. Value (of lots)
  10. Tax (on lots)
  11. Slaves 18-50
  12. Value (of Slaves)
  13. Tax (on Slaves)
  14. Carriages
  15. Value (of Carriages)
  16. Tax (on Carriages)
  17. White polls
  18. Tax (on White Polls)
  19. Amount of State Tax
  20. Total State and County Tax

Example: Jacob Coffman, 36 acres, $275 value, $0.13 1/2 tax, 10 acres of school land, $25 value, $0.01 tax, no town lots, no slaves, 1 white poll, $0.13  tax, $0.12 state tax. $0.25 total; tax

1.8 1838 tax list

Example from the 1838 tax list

The 1838 tax list contains the following information for each entry:

  1. Person's name
  2. Acres of land
  3. Value (of land)
  4. Tax (on land)
  5. Acres of School Land
  6. Value (of School Land)
  7. Tax (on School Land)
  8. Lots
  9. Value (of lots)
  10. Tax (on lots)
  11. Slaves 12-50
  12. Value (of Slaves)
  13. Tax (on Slaves)
  14. Carriages
  15. Value (of Carriages)
  16. Tax (on Carriages)
  17. White polls
  18. Tax (on White Polls)
  19. Amount of State Tax
  20. Total State and County Tax

Example: William Eoff, 355 acres, $2,800 value, <blank> tax, 200 acres school land, $1,600 value, $0.76 tax, no town lots, 3 slaves, $1,500 value, >blank> tax, 1 white poll, <blank> tax, $2.15 state tax, $6.84 total tax

1.9 1839 tax list

Example from the 1839 tax list

The 1839 tax list contains the following information for each entry:

  1. Person's name
  2. Acres of land
  3. Value (of land)
  4. Tax (on land)
  5. Acres of School Land
  6. Value (of School Land)
  7. Tax (on School Land)
  8. Lots
  9. Value (of lots)
  10. Tax (on lots)
  11. Slaves 18-48
  12. Value (of Slaves)
  13. Tax (on Slaves)
  14. Carriages
  15. Value (of Carriages)
  16. Tax (on Carriages)
  17. White polls
  18. Tax (on White Polls)
  19. Amount of State Tax
  20. Total State and County Tax

Example: Thomas B. Jeffries, 175 acres, $800 value, $0.40 tax, 25 acres school land, $300 value, $0.10 tax, no town lots, 3 slaves, $1,700 value, $0.85 tax, $0.12 tax, <blank> state tax, $1.07 total tax

2 Using tax lists in research

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Ages and relationships

The US census prior to 1850 did not list the names of children. It also gave only approximate ages for each individual in a household - often only within a category spanning ten years, such as age 20 to 30. Early tax lists are extremely valuable because examining lists over a range of years can show with an accuracy of one year when a tax payer turns certain ages, most often age 21 or age 50. Further, males coming of age and paying tax for the first time are almost always listed immediately after their father (or mother) in the tax list. Unfortunately, so few early lists for Bedford County, Tennessee survived that this is not as valuable a technique as in other locations.

Example 1: The following example from Montgomery County, Virginia tax lists shows four sons of Samuel Reidinger (John, Stephen, George, and Michael Reidinger) coming of reportable age (16 in Virginia at that time) and then later appearing in the tax lists besides their father as they turned 21 and became of taxable age.

The categories in these lists (except where notes) are: 

  1. No. of white males above 16 years old; 
  2. Slaves above 12 years old; 
  3. Horses, Asses, Mules, Mares and Colts; 
  4. Stud Horses; 
  5. others not listed here such as wheeled carriages. 
  6. The listings end with the total amount of tax owed:

1816 Cyrus Robinson's District:

Samuel Ridinger 2-0-2-0... $0.36
John Ridinger 1-0-2-0... $0.36

1817 William Currin's District:

Samuel Ridinger 3-0-2-0... $0.36
John Ridinger 1-0-2-0... $0.36

1818 William Currin's District:

Samuel Redinger 2-0-1-0... $0.18
John Redinger 1-0-1-0... $0.18
Stephen Redinger 1-0-0-0... $0.00

1819 William Currin's District:

(beginning this year the category "Slaves" was divided into two categories: Slaves between 9 and 12 years old and Slaves above 12 years old) John Ridinger 1-0-0-1-0... $0.18
Stephen Ridinger 1-0-0-0-0... $0.00
George Ridinger 1-0-0-1-0... $0.18
<Samuel Ridinger not listed this year>

1820 William Currin's District:

Samuel Rindinger 1-0-0-1-0... $0.18
John Ridinger 1-0-0-2-0... $0.35
Stephen Ridinger 1-0-0-0-0... $0.00
George Ridinger 1-0-0-1-0... $0.18

1821 William Currin's District:

Samuel Rindinger 1-0-0-1-0... $0.13 1/2
John Ridinger 1-0-0-2-0... $0.27
Stephen Ridinger 1-0-0-0-0... $0.00
George Ridinger 1-0-0-1-0... $0.13 1/2
Michael Ridinger 1-0-0-0-0... $0.00

Example 2: Tax lists typically say when an individual responsible for paying tax is acting in some court-appointed capacity.

1837 Tax List, Bedford County, Tennessee, 1st CD, Mary Shaw, guardian for R. Shaw:  150 acres, $1,500 value, $0.75 tax, 90 acres school land, $450 value, $0.22 1/2 tax, no town lots, 6 slaves, $3,100 value, $1.55 tax,  no white polls, $2.30 state tax, $5.05 total tax

Example 3: A person residing out of district may have another person designated as his "agent" for purposes of paying local taxes. Often there is some relationship between the individuals in such a case:

1836 Tax List, Bedford County, Tennessee, 5th CD, McKinzie by William Head, agent:  833 1/2 acres, $4,000 value, $4.00 tax, no school land,  no town lots, no slaves, no white polls, $2.00 state tax, $4.00 total tax

Example 4: Sometimes there are several individuals with similar or the same names in a tax list. In this case the list makers sometimes made additional annotations following the individual's name, often stating the relationship to some other individual.

Example 5: The following tax list data shows George Usselton (who was born on 10 Aug 1762 in Shrewsbury Parish, Kent, Maryland) turning age 50 and no longer having to pay tax:

Tax List, Rutherford County,Tennessee 1812, page 80 George Usselton No land owned 1 free poll 3 black polls total tax: $1.31 1/2

Tax List, Rutherford County,Tennessee 1813, page 64 George Uselton 80 acres no free polls 2 black polls total tax: $0.90 3/8

2.3 Period of residence

Tax lists can usually show within a year when a family moves to and/or leaves a location. The following example from the tax lists of Montgomery County, Virginia shows the Samuel Reidinger family arriving in Montgomery County in 1800 or 1801 and then moving on to Warren County (and later Bedford and Coffee counties, Tennessee, in 1822 or 1823. It also shows associated families that moved from York County, Pennsylvania to Montgomery County, Virginia at about the same time:

Example:

1796:

No Reidingers

1797:

No Reidingers

1799:

No Reidingers

1800:

No Reidingers
Moricle (Christopher, George) first appears
Miller (Adam, Phillip, William, Peter) first appears

1801 James Barnett's District (list submitted 15 August 1801):

Categories: Blacks above 12, Horses, Ordinary licenses, Carriages with two wheels, No. Stud Horses, Rates for Season (single rate), and Amount of Tax in dollars and cents

Samuel Ritinger 0-3-0-0 $0.36

Also listed this year: Jacob and Christian Epperly, John, William and Jacob Morricle, Daniel Spangler. George and Jacob Sowers and Daniel Shelor, Nathaniel Wickham

[1802 - 1820 omitted in this example]

1821 William Currin's District:

Samuel Rindinger 1-0-0-1-0... $0.13 1/2
John Ridinger 1-0-0-2-0... $0.27
Stephen Ridinger 1-0-0-0-0... $0.00
George Ridinger 1-0-0-1-0... $0.13 1/2
Michael Ridinger 1-0-0-0-0... $0.00

1822 William Currin's District:

The 1822 list is missing the last pages, from "N" and following.

1823 William Currin's District:

George Ridinger 1-0-1-0... $0.12

1824 William Currin's District:

George Ridinger 0-3-0... $0.36

2.4 Ownership of taxable property

By analyzing the property that a person pays taxes on you can determine:

  1. The relative wealth of an individual compared to the wealth of his neighbors.
  2. Changes in wealth over a period of years may be determined by examining changes in the amount of property owned over the years.

Example: All of the other examples in this tutorial give lists of the taxable property owned by individuals. 

2.5 Date of death

Tax lists will often list property belonging to the heirs of an estate during the period that the estate is in probate under either the name of the executor or administrator or simply in a form like "Heirs of John Doe" or "John Doe heirs". By observing changes in listings over several years, a date of death can be approximated and sometimes even the heirs determined.

Example 1: 1837 Tax List, Bedford County, Tennessee, 1st CD, John Gregory heirs: 61 3/4 acres, $617 value, $0.31 3/4 tax, no school land, no town lots, 2 slaves, $1,600 value, $0.50 tax, no white polls, $1.10 1/2 state tax, $2.21 3/4 total tax

Example 2: 1836 Tax List, Bedford County, Tennessee, 4th CD, R. H. Majors for Clardy's heirs: 200 acres, $1,600 value, $1.60 tax, no school land, no town lots, 2 slaves, $900 value, $0.90 tax, no white polls, $1.25 state tax, $2.50 total tax

1837 Tax List, Bedford County, Tennessee, 4th CD, Robert H. Majors, Executor for R. Clardy's heirs: 200 acres, $1,600 value, $1.60 tax, no school land, no town lots, 1 slaves, $500 value, $0.25 tax, no white polls, $1.15 state tax, $2.30 total tax

Example 3: This example shows Joseph A. Arnold and two likely sons listed on adjacent lines in the tax list. In the next year, Joseph A. Arnold is probably deceased because his listing says "Joseph A. Arnold, Administrator":

1836 Tax List, Bedford County, Tennessee, 10th CD, Joseph A. Arnold: 150 acres,... with John W. Arnold, 50 acres,... and Elisha Arnold 48 acres,... listed on the next two lines

1837 Tax List, Bedford County, Tennessee, 10th CD, Joseph A. Arnold, Administrator: 150 acres,... with John W. Arnold, 50 acres,... and Elisha Arnold 48 acres,... listed on the next two lines

2.6 Identification of property passed by probate

Property that passes to an individual through probate was not generally conveyed by recorded deeds. By looking for a set of increases in land owned by several individuals in a single year, property divisions recorded in lost probate records may be identified. This applies to both land and slaves. Also, the disappearance of a male landowner from the tax list and his replacement by a female with the same surname and amount of land discloses the given name of a spouse that would not have been recorded in early census data.

2.7 Newly acquired property

In many counties (but not Bedford County, Tennessee) tax lists itemized all newly purchased or inherited property for that tax year. This information can be correlated with that in other records, such as deed books and probate or county court records.

Example 1: In Bedford County, Tennessee in 1837 the tax list itemized in a special list all of the names and property that moved into the 11th CD of Bedford County when Marshall County, Tennessee was established and most of the 12th through 17th CDs of Bedford County became parts of Marshall County, Tennessee.

Even without an explicit list of newly acquired property, changes in the amount of taxable property between tax years indicates purchase, inheritance, sale, or sometimes lease of property.

3 Partial transcription of the 1814 tax list

Here is a partial transcription of the 1814 tax list of Bedford County, Tennessee. This provides a good idea of the sort of information found in this list.

  1. Gabriel Anderson, 100 acres on Bellbuckle Creek, one 16 X 15 dwelling house, valuation 160, no slaves
  2. John Anderton, no land, one Female Slave between 12 and 51 years, value $300
  3. Thomas B. Brown
  4. Edmund Brown
  5. Charles Cooper, 40 acres in Little Flat Creek, one 16 X 16 dwelling house, 1 out building, valuation $236, one Male Slave under 12 years, one Male Slave between 12 and 51 years, one Female Slave between 12 and 51 years, total tax $1036
  6. Charles Cooper, no land, one Female Slave under 12 years, value $350
  7. Robert Cooper, no land, one Female Slave under 12 years, value $350
  8. William Cooper, 40 acres on Wartrace Fork, one 18 X 16 dwelling house, no out buildings, valuation $450, one Female Slave under 12 years, value $350, total tax $800
  9. Andrew Erwin (a three page listing of his property totaling 61,403 acres)
  10. Nathan Frizel, 200 acres on the Wartrace Fork, one 31 X 15 dwelling house, three out buildings, valuation $400, no slaves
  11. James Haggard 50 acres on the Garrison Fork, one 16 X 16 dwelling house, four out buildings, valuation $350, no slaves
  12. Samuel Haggard 50 acres on the Garrison Fork, one 17 X 15 dwelling house, two out buildings, valuation $300, no slaves
  13. Mosby Harriss, 100 acres on Wartrace Fork, one 32 X 16 dwelling house, 4 out buildings, valuation $600, one Male Slave between 12 and 51 years, slave valuation $450
  14. Duddley Hale, 100 acres on the Wartrace Fork, one 20 X 18 dwelling house, four out buildings, valuation $350, 1 Female Slave between 12 and 51 years, slave valuation $350
  15. John Hail, 75 acres on Noah's Fork, one 20 X 18 dwelling house, two out buildings, valuation $150
  16. Mead Hale, 100 acres on Noah's Fork, one 20 X 16 dwelling house, two out buildings, valuation $300
  17. George Hill 250 acres on the Wartrace Fork, one 20 X 16 dwelling house, two out buildings, valuation $1000, no slaves
  18. James Hill 112 acres on Spring Creek, one 16 X 20 dwelling house, two out buildings, valuation $168, 1 Male Slave between 12 and 51 years, 1 Female Slave under 12 years, 1 Female Slave between 12 and 51 years, slave valuation $750
  19. Wood Jones of Davidson County, 757 acres on Thompson's Creek and Little Flat Creek, no dwelling house, no out buildings, valuation $1,500
  20. Benjamin King, 122 1/2 acres on the Wartrace Fork, 1 14 X 16 dwelling house, no out buildings, valuation $367.50, no slaves
  21. Frances King, 200 acres on Main Duck River, one 18 X 16 dwelling house, 1 out house, valuation $1,000, no slaves
  22. John King, 425 acres on the Garrison Fork, one 38 X 15 dwelling house, 3 out buildings, valuation $1,700, 1 Male Slaves under 12 years, 1 Male Slave between 12 and 51 years, 0 Male Slaves over 51 years, 2 Female Slaves under 12 years, 1 Female Slave between 12 and 51 years, 0 Female Slaves over 51 years, slave valuation $1,350
  23. Samuel King, 360 acres on the Barren Fork, one 2 18 X 18 dwelling house, 3 out buildings, valuation $1,980, no slaves
  24. Thomas King, no land, 2 Male Slaves under 12 years, 1 Male Slave between 12 and 51 years, 0 Male Slaves over 51 years, 1 Female Slave under 12 years, 2 Female Slaves between 12 and 51 years, 0 Female Slaves over 51 years, slave valuation $1,450
  25. Joseph Long, 87 acres on Thompson's Creek, one 20 X 17 dwelling house, no out buildings, valuation $217.50; no slaves 
  26. John McCrory
  27. John McClure
  28. Matthew Mullen, 100 acres on main Duck River, one dwelling house (size not given) valuation $500, one female slave under 12, slave value $200
  29. John Mullen, no land, one female slave under 12, slave value $200
  30. John and James Nall
  31. George Newton
  32. Margrett Nichols, 174 acres on Noah's Fork, one 24 X 18 dwelling house, two out buildings, valuation $696, 2 Male Slaves under 12 years, 1 Male Slave between 12 and 51 years, 0 Male Slaves over 51 years, 1 Female Slave under 12 years, 4 Female Slaves between 12 and 51 years, 0 Female Slaves over 51 years, slave valuation $2225
  33. Thomas Norman, 60 acres on Gage's Creek, one 14 X 16 dwelling house, 1 out building, valuation $200, no slaves
  34. Thomas Owen
  35. David Owen
  36. Arthur Owen
  37. Thomas Patton
  38. Baxter Ragsdale, 100 acres on Wartrace Fork, one 28 X 17 dwelling house, 4 out buildings, valuation $800, two Female Slaves between 12 and 51 years, slave valuation $550
  39. John Ragsdale, 57 acres on Bell Buckle Creek, one 26 X 18 dwelling house, 3 out buildings, valuation $399, one Male Slaves over 51 years, one Female Slaves under 12 years, one Female Slaves between 12 and 51 years, slave valuation $850
  40. John Taylor and George Doherty, 180 acres on Wartrace Fork, one 16 X 20 dwelling house, 3 out buildings, valuation $720, no slaves
  41. James Ross Sr.
  42. James Ross Jr.
  43. Thomas Ross
  44. William Ross
  45. Obejiah Ross
  46. Christopher Shaw, 450 acres in Garrison Fork, Puncheon Camp Creek, no dwelling houses, 4 out buildings, valuation $3030.50, 1 Male Slave under 12 years, 6 Male Slaves between 12 and 51 years, 0 Male Slaves over 51 years, 2 Female Slaves under 12 years, 3 Female Slaves between 12 and 51 years, 1 Female Slave over 51 years, valuation of slaves $4,150
  47. Anderson Smith, 60 acres on Brewer's Creek of Barren Fork, one 20 X 15 dwelling house, 3 out buildings, value $150, no slaves
  48. Vincent Smith, 100 acres on Garrison Fork, one 26 X 16 dwelling house, 4 out buildings, value $500, no slaves
  49. Thomas Smith, 45 acres on Garrison Fork and Rileys Creek, one 18 X 18 dwelling house, 7 out buildings, value $345, two Male Slaves under 12 years, one Female Slave under 12 years, one Female Slave between 12 and 51 years, value of slaves $750
  50. Joseph Taylor and George Doherty, 200 acres on Wartrace Fork, no dwelling house, 3 out buildings, valuation $800, no slaves
  51. Edward Teal, 45 acres on Noah's Fork, one 18 X 14 dwelling house, two out buildings, valuation $135, no slaves
  52. Timothy Teal, 30 acres on Noah's Fork, one 16 X 16 dwelling house, two out buildings, valuation $60, no slaves
  53. Jeremiah Terry, 200 acres on waters of Duck River, Return by Keeble Terry, valuation $500, no slaves (on out of district list) 
  54. John Tillman, 200 acres on the Garrison Fork of Duck River, one 29 X 17 dwelling house, 6 out buildings, valuation $1,200. 0 Male Slaves under 12 years. 4 Male Slaves between 12 and 51 years, 0 Male Slaves over 51 years, 3 Female Slaves under 12 years, 2 Female Slaves between 12 and 51 years, 0 Female Slaves over 51 years, Valuation [of slaves] $255, and on the correction list: error in Negro Column of John Tillman 2295 deficit
  55. William Waite
  56. George Waite
  57. Robert Waite
  58. James Walker, 210 acres on "Rileys Creek, Barren Fork and Garrison Fork", no buildings but annotated as "improved", valuation $450, no slaves
  59. James Walker, two 1/2 acre town lots lying on the main street west side of Spring Branch, no buildings, valuation $75, no slaves
  60. John Walker, 800 acres on Noah's Fork, one 20 X 18 dwelling house, valuation $4,000, no slaves
  61. John Walker, one grist mill and one saw mill, valuation $1,000, no slaves
  62. Johnathan Webster
  63. Jacob Whitworth, 150 acres on the Wartrace Fork, one 24 X 18 dwelling house, 3 out buildings, valuation $750, 1 Male Slave under 12 years, valuation $300
  64. Isaac Whitworth, 100 acres on Noah's Fork of Duck River, one 19 X 17 dwelling house, valuation $100, no slaves
  65. Michal Wilson, 20 acres on Thompson Creek, one 14 X 16 dwelling house, no out buildings, value $40, no slaves
  66. John Wilson, 100 acres on Barren Fork, one 17 X 17 dwelling house, 4 out buildings, value $600, two Female Slaves under 12 years, one Female Slave between 12 and 51 years, slave value $600
  67. James Woodrum, 160 acres on Noah's Fork, one 18 X 16 dwelling house, 3 out buildings, value $320, no slaves
  68. Joel Woodrum, 10 acres on Noah's Fork, one 16 X 16 dwelling house, 3 out buildings, value $20, no slaves
  69. Elias Yates
  70. Percy Yell
  71. Moses Yell

Copies of the seven earliest surviving tax lists of Bedford County, Tennessee (1812, 1814, 1836, 1837, 1838, and 1839) are available on CD-ROM from GSC Associates. Click here to learn more.

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